Dell Visor Windows Mixed Reality Headset

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CUSTOMER RATING

The hardware, software and design of the Windows mixed reality HMDs are all amazing, but the Visor is neither the best looking or best-priced example. If you get it bundled with a fancy Dell computer, you could do worse, but if you’re buying just the HMD you may want to think twice.

PROS
  • Inside Out Tracking
  • Easy to Set Up
  • High Quality Hardware and Software
CONS
  • Poor Aesthetics
  • Intended for Developers
  • Low Specification Mode Limited to 60Hz

VRS Review

VRS OVERALL RATING
Recomended Not Recomended

The Dell Visor is another addition to the Windows Mixed Reality family of headsets, alongside two developer units from Acer and HP, and another consumer product from Lenovo known as the Lenovo Explorer.

Unlike the other HMDs mentioned above, Dell is very much driving the marketing of the Visor itself, whereas you can find the other three headsets on Microsoft’s own digital storefront.

Dell is marketing the Visor as part of its own high-end systems. So far this is also the most expensive of the Windows mixed reality HMDs.

You wouldn’t know to look at it however, since frankly the Dell Visor looks cheaper than even the Acer developer edition unit. More importantly, the specifications of the Visor are basically identical to all the other Windows mixed reality units. It seems that all the first-generation HMDs from this technology family have stuck closely to Microsoft’s reference design.

The Visor provides  two 1440×1440 LCD panels at 90 Hz and 105 degrees when it comes to the field of vision. That’s a bit less than the Oculus or Vive at 110-degrees, but still above the 90-degree minimum required for immersive presence.

Like the other mixed reality HMDs the visor has a design strongly similar to the Sony PSVR. It uses a single headband that can easily be removed or put back on the head. The HMD visor itself is mounted on a hinge, so that it can be flipped up without being removed completely. Since this is a mixed reality device and has productivity applications at its heart, it’s been designed as something you’d actually use all day.

There are no built-in headphones, but there is an audio pass-through socket. A single cable carries the USB and HDMI signals. You’ll also notice that there is no external tracking device such as an IR camera. Instead the Visor uses a revolutionary inside-out tracking technology that uses the two front-facing cameras to track the room around you. That makes this HMD and other Windows mixed reality units truly portable and quick to set up.

Another interesting departure compared to an Oculus or Vive comes from the minimum requirements. For premium VR the required specifications are the same, but there’s a low-spec mode that works with the Intel HD 620 GPU and up which lowers the refresh rate to 60Hz. In this mode more pedestrian AR and VR apps can be used, such as virtual desktops.

The hardware, software and design of the Windows mixed reality HMDs are all amazing, but the Visor is neither the best looking or best-priced example. If you get it bundled with a fancy Dell computer, you could do worse, but if you’re buying just the HMD you may want to think twice.

SPECIFICATIONS

Display LCD
Panel size 2.89"
Resolution 1440x1440x2
Refresh rate 90Hz
Field of view 105°
Sensors 6 Degrees of Freedom Motion Tracking, Inside Out Tracking
Connections HDMI, USB 3.0, Audio Out
Audio Built in 3.5mm jack

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